Why shouldn’t we compel them to come in? Locke, the Enlightenment, and the debate over religious toleration

Most people in the West today unreflectively accept the need for religious toleration. Of course, if pressed, they will admit that toleration, like freedom of speech, can’t be absolute; there must
Most people in the West today unreflectively accept the need for religious toleration. Of course, if pressed, they will admit that toleration, like freedom of speech, can’t be absolute; there must [More]

Arguments about (paradoxical) arguments

As regular readers know, I understand paradoxes to be a particular type of argument. The post Arguments about (paradoxical) arguments appeared first on
As regular readers know, I understand paradoxes to be a particular type of argument. The post Arguments about (paradoxical) arguments appeared first on [More]

What is social justice?

Notions of social justice generally embrace values such as the equal worth of all citizens, their equal right to meet their basic needs, the need to spread opportunity and life chances as widely as
Notions of social justice generally embrace values such as the equal worth of all citizens, their equal right to meet their basic needs, the need to spread opportunity and life chances as widely as [More]

Philosopher of the Month: Socrates

This March, the OUP Philosophy team honors Socrates (470-399 BC) as their Philosopher of the Month. As elusive as he is a groundbreaking figure in the history of philosophy, this Athenian thinker is
This March, the OUP Philosophy team honors Socrates (470-399 BC) as their Philosopher of the Month. As elusive as he is a groundbreaking figure in the history of philosophy, this Athenian thinker is [More]

How well do you know Friedrich Nietzsche?

This February, the OUP Philosophy team honors Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) as their Philosopher of the Month. The post How well do you know Friedrich Nietzsche? appeared first on
This February, the OUP Philosophy team honors Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) as their Philosopher of the Month. The post How well do you know Friedrich Nietzsche? appeared first on [More]

Graphs and paradoxes

A directed graph is a pair where N is any collection or set of objects (the nodes of the graph) and E is a relation on N (the edges). Intuitively speaking, we can think of a directed graph in terms
A directed graph is a pair where N is any collection or set of objects (the nodes of the graph) and E is a relation on N (the edges). Intuitively speaking, we can think of a directed graph in terms [More]

Immunology in perspective

Among students of science, in contrast to those who do science, the dominant discussion revolves around the degree to which scientific interpretations are subject to extra-curricular influences,
Among students of science, in contrast to those who do science, the dominant discussion revolves around the degree to which scientific interpretations are subject to extra-curricular influences, [More]

Ineffable facts, deep ignorance, and the sub-algebra hypothesis: Part 2

If there are any ineffable facts, then it is striking that they essentially are nowhere to be found. It is natural to think of ineffable facts as rare, radical exceptions, something unusual, maybe
If there are any ineffable facts, then it is striking that they essentially are nowhere to be found. It is natural to think of ineffable facts as rare, radical exceptions, something unusual, maybe [More]

Philosopher of the month: Friedrich Nietzsche

This February, the OUP Philosophy team honors Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) as their Philosopher of the Month. The post Philosopher of the month: Friedrich Nietzsche appeared first on
This February, the OUP Philosophy team honors Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) as their Philosopher of the Month. The post Philosopher of the month: Friedrich Nietzsche appeared first on [More]

Ineffable facts, deep ignorance, and the sub-algebra hypothesis: Part 1

There are many things we do not know, but sometimes our ignorance runs deeper than other times. The post Ineffable facts, deep ignorance, and the sub-algebra hypothesis: Part 1 appeared first on
There are many things we do not know, but sometimes our ignorance runs deeper than other times. The post Ineffable facts, deep ignorance, and the sub-algebra hypothesis: Part 1 appeared first on [More]