In 1973, <strong>Jerry Saltz</strong> was 22, full of himself and making art obsessively. He battled self-doubt and lost. But he learned how to be a critic

In 1973, Jerry Saltz was 22, full of himself and making art obsessively. He battled self-doubt and lost. But he learned how to be a
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In 1973, Jerry Saltz was 22, full of himself and making art obsessively. He battled self-doubt and lost. But he learned how to be a critic

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

We think we know more than our ancestors, but as individuals we know less. We rely on the expertise of others, comforting ourselves with an <strong>illusion of knowledge</strong>

We think we know more than our ancestors, but as individuals we know less. We rely on the expertise of others, comforting ourselves with an illusion of
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We think we know more than our ancestors, but as individuals we know less. We rely on the expertise of others, comforting ourselves with an illusion of knowledge

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

For centuries the peat bogs of Northern Europe have yielded remarkably well-preserved <strong>ancient cadavers</strong>. At least we know how they died

For centuries the peat bogs of Northern Europe have yielded remarkably well-preserved ancient cadavers. At least we know how they
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For centuries the peat bogs of Northern Europe have yielded remarkably well-preserved ancient cadavers. At least we know how they died

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Knowledge and the Gettier Problem

2017.04.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephen Hetherington, Knowledge and the Gettier Problem, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 241pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.04.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephen Hetherington, Knowledge and the Gettier Problem, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 241pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107149564. Reviewed by Anthony Robert Booth, University of Sussex The publication of Edmund Gettier’s famous paper in 1963 seemed to fire a start-gun in epistemology for a race to come up with a (reductive) analysis of knowledge. The finishing line would be an improved analysis over the ‘traditional’ Justified-True-Belief (JTB) account—improved in the sense that a subject’s knowing would be immune to ‘being Gettiered’. Correlatively, a parallel line of research opened up with the purpose of formulating what it is for a belief to ‘be Gettiered’, to explain why it is that a Gettiered, justified, true belief is never knowledge, and why it has been so hard to find a satisfactory analysis of it — what William Lycan (2006) called the ‘Gettier-problem problem’. Several such analyses of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Why did <strong><em>Les Mis&eacute;rables</em></strong>, a 500,000-word novel composed over 16 years, conquer the world? Because Victor Hugo, who believed in progress, told a story of irrepressible optimism

Why did Les Mis&amp;eacute;rables, a 500,000-word novel composed over 16 years, conquer the world? Because Victor Hugo, who believed in progress, told a story of irrepressible
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Why did Les Misérables, a 500,000-word novel composed over 16 years, conquer the world? Because Victor Hugo, who believed in progress, told a story of irrepressible optimism

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The idea that free speech is contrary to social inclusiveness represents a pernicious shift in Western culture. Stifling hate speech does not safeguard the oppressed. It <strong>empowers the oppressors</strong>

The idea that free speech is contrary to social inclusiveness represents a pernicious shift in Western culture. Stifling hate speech does not safeguard the oppressed. It empowers the
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The idea that free speech is contrary to social inclusiveness represents a pernicious shift in Western culture. Stifling hate speech does not safeguard the oppressed. It empowers the oppressors

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

How well do you know John Stuart Mill? [quiz]

This April, the OUP Philosophy team honors John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) as their Philosopher of the Month. Among the most important philosophers, economists, and intellectual figures of the
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This April, the OUP Philosophy team honors John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) as their Philosopher of the Month. Among the most important philosophers, economists, and intellectual figures of the nineteenth century, today Mill is considered a founding father of liberal thought. A prolific author, Mill’s collected works encompass thirty-three volumes ranging in subject from philosophy to social issues and beyond. How much do you know about John Stuart Mill? Take our quiz and test your knowledge of this great British thinker. Quiz image: Photo of John Stuart Mill by London Stereoscopic Company. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. Featured image: Tower Bridge, London. Photo by Detroit Publishing Company. CC-BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons. The post How well do you know John Stuart Mill? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesWhy shouldn’t we compel them to come in? Locke, the Enlightenment, and the debate over religious. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting

2017.04.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shannon Vallor, Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting, Oxford University Press, 2016,
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2017.04.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shannon Vallor, Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting, Oxford University Press, 2016, 309pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190498511. Reviewed by Benjamin I. Huff, Randolph-Macon College Shannon Vallor makes a compelling argument for renewing the cultivation of the virtues in order to meet the challenges of our technological age. She argues on the one hand that rapid technological change creates a special need for moral virtues to guide us in choosing among our many possible futures, and in managing new and unexpected opportunities and hazards. On the other hand, she argues that changes in technology create new challenges to the cultivation of virtue itself which call for wise and creative responses. Vallor takes a comprehensive approach, addressing both theory and applications. In Part I, she articulates the need for "a technomoral virtue ethic of global scope" (64) to guide. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Why did <strong><em>Les Mis&eacute;rables</em></strong>, a 500,000 word novel composed over 16 years, conquer the world? Because Victor Hugo, who believed in progress, told a story of irrepressible optimism

Why did Les Mis&amp;eacute;rables, a 500,000 word novel composed over 16 years, conquer the world? Because Victor Hugo, who believed in progress, told a story of irrepressible
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Why did Les Misérables, a 500,000 word novel composed over 16 years, conquer the world? Because Victor Hugo, who believed in progress, told a story of irrepressible optimism

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The seeker. <strong>Rod Dreher</strong> is a spiritually and intellectually restless writer: He's confessional, sincere, and sometimes overwrought. Can he ignite a turn toward modern monasticism?

The seeker. Rod Dreher is a spiritually and intellectually restless writer: He&#39;s confessional, sincere, and sometimes overwrought. Can he ignite a turn toward modern
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The seeker. Rod Dreher is a spiritually and intellectually restless writer: He's confessional, sincere, and sometimes overwrought. Can he ignite a turn toward modern monasticism?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily