Is <strong>free speech under threat</strong> in the United States? Not exactly, or at least not in the ways you might think. A <em>Commentary</em> symposium

Is free speech under threat in the United States? Not exactly, or at least not in the ways you might think. A Commentary
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Is free speech under threat in the United States? Not exactly, or at least not in the ways you might think. A Commentary symposium

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Asked about his transformation from Oxford don to <strong>thought leader</strong>, Niall Ferguson was blunt: &ldquo;I did it all for the money.&rdquo; He's not alone

Asked about his transformation from Oxford don to thought leader, Niall Ferguson was blunt: &amp;ldquo;I did it all for the money.&amp;rdquo; He&#39;s not
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Asked about his transformation from Oxford don to thought leader, Niall Ferguson was blunt: “I did it all for the money.” He's not alone

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The <strong>Bront&euml; brother</strong>, Branwell, was known for vices &mdash; opiates, alcohol, married women, setting his bed on fire &mdash; but he had literary virtues as well

The Bront&amp;euml; brother, Branwell, was known for vices &amp;mdash; opiates, alcohol, married women, setting his bed on fire &amp;mdash; but he had literary virtues as
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The Brontë brother, Branwell, was known for vices — opiates, alcohol, married women, setting his bed on fire — but he had literary virtues as well

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Understanding Foucault, Understanding Modernism

2017.06.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Scott (ed.), Understanding Foucault, Understanding Modernism, Bloomsbury, 2017, 265pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.06.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Scott (ed.), Understanding Foucault, Understanding Modernism, Bloomsbury, 2017, 265pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781628927702. Reviewed by Corey McCall, Elmira College This edited collection is the third volume in a series that examines key philosophers' work in relationship to modernism. As stated in the series preface, the goal is to make key writings of each thinker accessible while also relating their works to modernism. Each volume in the series has three sections: a first, which focuses on "conceptualizing" the volume's philosopher, a second "on aesthetics, which "maps connections between modernist works and the philosophical figure," while the final section consists of brief essays on key terms relevant for understanding the philosopher's relationship to modernism (vii). In theory, this structure should appeal to a wide audience, for readers less familiar with Foucault will find the first and third. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Virtual Cheating IV: Sexbots

Embed from Getty Images While science fiction has long included speculation about robot-human sex and romance, the current technology offers little more than sex dolls. In terms of the physical
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Embed from Getty Images While science fiction has long included speculation about robot-human sex and romance, the current technology offers little more than sex dolls. In terms of the physical aspects of sexual activity, the development of more “active” sexbots is an engineering problem—getting the machinery to perform properly and in ways that are safe for the user (or unsafe, if that is what one wants). Regarding cheating, while a suitably advanced sexbot could actively engage in sexual activity with a human, the sexbot would not be a person and hence the standard definition of cheating (as discussed in the previous essays) would not be met. Put another way, sexual activity with such a sexbot would be analogous to the use of any other sex toy (such as a simple “blow up doll” or vibrator). Since a person cannot cheat with an object, such activity would not be cheating. Naturally enough, some people might take issue with their partner sexing it up with a sexbot and forbid such. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Temporal Consciousness

[Revised entry by Barry Dainton on June 28, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, empirical-findings.html, notes.html, specious-present.html] In ordinary conscious experience, consciousness
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[Revised entry by Barry Dainton on June 28, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, empirical-findings.html, notes.html, specious-present.html] In ordinary conscious experience, consciousness of time seems to be ubiquitous. For example, we seem to be directly aware of change, movement, and succession across brief temporal intervals. How is this possible? Many different models of temporal consciousness have been proposed. Some philosophers have argued that consciousness is confined to a momentary interval and that we are not in fact directly aware of change. Others have argued that...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Rousseau, self-love, and an increasingly connected world

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was one of the most influential thinkers of the eighteenth century French enlightenment period. Born in Geneva in 1712, Rousseau made important contributions to philosophy,
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau was one of the most influential thinkers of the eighteenth century French enlightenment period. Born in Geneva in 1712, Rousseau made important contributions to philosophy, literature, and even music. The work that initially made him famous is the Discourse on the Sciences and Arts, his submission to an essay contest put forth by the Academy of Dijon in 1750. Rousseau’s answer to their prompt “Has the restoration of the sciences and arts tended to purify morals?” won the prize, although his answer was somewhat surprising given the ideals one generally associates with enlightenment. He claimed that advances in the sciences and arts come at the expense of virtue. The argument proceeds on a number of levels, but one of Rousseau’s most striking claims was that societies that value scientific and artistic progress come to praise talent instead of genuine moral goodness. He wrote, “One no longer asks if a man is upright, but rather if he is talented; nor of a book if. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

The life of a <strong>ghostwriter</strong>. Don't argue with clients, however repulsive. And remember, you'll probably receive no recognition &mdash; which may be a good thing

The life of a ghostwriter. Don&#39;t argue with clients, however repulsive. And remember, you&#39;ll probably receive no recognition &amp;mdash; which may be a good
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The life of a ghostwriter. Don't argue with clients, however repulsive. And remember, you'll probably receive no recognition — which may be a good thing

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Cockroaches, crummy days, and lousy lakes. For <strong>Grace Paley</strong>, every part of life was worthy of literary attention. There was beauty in banality

Cockroaches, crummy days, and lousy lakes. For Grace Paley, every part of life was worthy of literary attention. There was beauty in
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Cockroaches, crummy days, and lousy lakes. For Grace Paley, every part of life was worthy of literary attention. There was beauty in banality

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Golden age of the <strong>short story</strong>: the 1890s? 1980s? 2010s? We&rsquo;ve been celebrating the &ldquo;revival&rdquo; of the form since Chekhov. Some perspective, please&nbsp;

Golden age of the short story: the 1890s? 1980s? 2010s? We&amp;rsquo;ve been celebrating the &amp;ldquo;revival&amp;rdquo; of the form since Chekhov. Some perspective,
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Golden age of the short story: the 1890s? 1980s? 2010s? We’ve been celebrating the “revival” of the form since Chekhov. Some perspective, please 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily