Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

Skepticism and Content Externalism

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[Revised entry by Michael McKinsey on May 23, 2018. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Michael McKinsey replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.] A number of skeptical hypotheses or scenarios have been proposed which can be used as the basis for arguments to the effect that we lack knowledge of various propositions about objects in the external world,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Medieval Theories of the Emotions

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[New Entry by Simo Knuuttila on May 23, 2018.] One of the many uses of the Greek word pathos in ancient philosophy referred, roughly speaking, to what we call emotions. The corresponding Latin terms were passio, affectus or affectio. Medieval theories of emotions were essentially based on ancient sources. The new developments included the discussion of emotions from the point of view of Avicennian faculty psychology, the production of systematic taxonomies particularly in thirteenth-century Aristotelianism, the detailed studies of voluntary...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Reasonableness and Fairness: A Historical Theory

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2018.05.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher McMahon, Reasonableness and Fairness: A Historical Theory, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 252pp., $99.99, ISBN 9781107177178. Reviewed by Judith Lynn Failer, Indiana University, Bloomington In an era of deep political and social cleavages, it has become a commonplace to lament that our inability to talk to each other has begun to erode our democracies. After all, if we cannot learn from each other what we need, how can we craft appropriate programs? Christopher McMahon offers a theory that forms the foundation necessary to address that question. His stated goal is to understand what is happening when people who are trying to coordinate activities make competently reasoned judgments about what is reasonable and fair. To that end, he provides a normative theory that describes that process and its prerequisites, and shows how it works in terms of political cooperation. He also adds a descriptive. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Bergson: Thinking Beyond the Human Condition

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2018.05.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Keith Ansell-Pearson, Bergson: Thinking Beyond the Human Condition, Bloomsbury, 2018, 194 pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781350043954   Reviewed by Donald A. Landes, Université Laval In his introduction to the remarkable new Quadrige/PUF collection of critical editions of Henri Bergson's works in French, Frédéric Worms rightly suggests that, like all philosophical classics, Bergson's oeuvre deserves to be both read with fresh eyes, as if it has just appeared, and studied with the help of scholarly tools equal to its importance and influence.[1] By offering a lively reading of Bergson's texts and providing scholarly explorations of connections, influences, comparisons, and potential further contributions, Keith Ansell-Pearson fulfills both of these goals. The volume is the result of two decades of his research and teaching, gathering together his essays and chapters on various aspects of Bergson's thought, with. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Michel Foucault

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[Revised entry by Gary Gutting and Johanna Oksala on May 22, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Michel Foucault (1926 - 1984) was a French historian and philosopher, associated with the structuralist and post-structuralist movements. He has had strong influence not only (or even primarily) in philosophy but also in a wide range of humanistic and social scientific disciplines....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Quine's New Foundations

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[Revised entry by Thomas Forster on May 22, 2018. Changes to: Main text] Quine's system of axiomatic set theory, NF, takes its name from the title ("New Foundations for Mathematical Logic") of the 1937 article which introduced it (Quine [1937a]). The axioms of NF are extensionality: [ forall xforall y[x=y leftrightarrow forall z(z in x leftrightarrow z in y)]...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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