post-truth" was coined in 1992, the malady is not new. And postmodernism isn't to blame. The problem isn't about epistemology; it's about identity" href="/post/2017/08/21/Though-lt;stronggt;post-truthlt;stronggt;-was-coined-in-1992-the-malady-is-not-new-And-postmodernism-isnt-to-blame-The-problem-isnt-about-epistemology;-its-about-identity.aspx" />

The strange case of the missing non-existent objects

Alexius Meinong (1853-1920) was an Austrian psychologist and systematic philosopher working in Graz around the turn of the 20th century. Part of his work was to put forward a sophisticated analysis
Philosophy News image
Let me tell you—briefly—about strange case from the history of philosophy. Alexius Meinong (1853-1920) was an Austrian psychologist and systematic philosopher working in Graz around the turn of the 20th century. Part of his work was to put forward a sophisticated analysis of the content of thought.  A notable aspect of this was as follows. If you are thinking of the Taj Mahal, you are thinking of something, and that something exists. Similarly, if you are thinking of Father Christmas, you are thinking of something—but that something does not exist. (Sorry.) Similarly, you can fear something, worship something, admire something; and that something may or may not exist. A very commonsense view, you might think—and so it is. It was a view shared by Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) in 1903; but in 1905 something interesting happened. Russell proposed a theory (known now as his theory of definite descriptions), according to which names like “Father Christmas” were shorthand for. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

blog comments powered by Disqus