The Unity of Consciousness

[Revised entry by Andrew Brook and Paul Raymont on May 19, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Human consciousness usually displays a striking unity. When one experiences a noise and, say,
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[Revised entry by Andrew Brook and Paul Raymont on May 19, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Human consciousness usually displays a striking unity. When one experiences a noise and, say, a pain, one is not conscious of the noise and then, separately, of the pain. One is conscious of the noise and pain together, as aspects of a single conscious experience. Since at least the time of Immanuel Kant (1781/7), this phenomenon has been called the unity of consciousness. More generally, it is consciousness not of A and, separately, of B and, separately, of C, but of...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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