Aesthetics and politics: Donald Trump’s idea of art and beauty

President Donald Trump's description of Confederate statues as "beautiful" merely mirrors his previously-mentioned objects of aesthetic preference. Before the statues, there was the "beautiful
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President Donald Trump’s description of Confederate statues as “beautiful” merely mirrors his previously-mentioned objects of aesthetic preference. Before the statues, there was the “beautiful wall,” an oddly-conceived barrier prospectively bedecked with a “beautiful door.” Still earlier, in a more expressly deconstructive vein, and when the erection of Trump Tower had required prior demolition of the Bonwit Teller building in Manhattan in 1980, Mr. Trump’s artful response was to jackhammer its widely-prized art relief into dust. For Donald Trump, this treasure, that had been singled out for rescue by the Metropolitan Museum of Art (the loss was lamented, among others, by Ashton Hawkins, then Vice-President of the Met’s Board of Trustees) was just not sufficiently beautiful to preserve. But it’s not just about walls and buildings. Mr. Trump’s most frequent references to beauty have had to do with women. By themselves,. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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