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Philosopher’s Annual Selections

Philosopher’s Annual is “an attempt to pick the ten best articles of the year” in academic philosophy. Volume 38, covering articles from 2018, is about to be released. The ten articles in that volume are: Mark Alfano, J. Adam Carter & Marc Cheong, “Technological Seduction and Self-Radicalization,” from the Journal of the American Philosophical Association Jc Beall, “The Simple Argument for Subclassical Logic,” from Philosophical Issues Selim Berker, “The Unity of Grounding,” from Mind Guillermo Del Pinal, “Meaning, Modulation, and Context: A Multidimensional Semantics for Truth-Conditional Pragmatics,” from Linguistics and Philosophy Louise Hanson, “Moral Realism, Aesthetic Realism, and the Asymmetry Claim,” from Ethics Remco Heesen, “When Journal Editors Play Favorites,” from Philosophical Studies Matthias Jenny, “Counterpossibles in Science: The Case of Relative Computability,” from Noûs Dilip Ninan, “Quantification and Epistemic Modality,” from the Philosophical Review Amia Srinivasan, “The Aptness of Anger,” from the Journal of Political Philosophy  Kenneth Walden, “Practical Reason Not As Such,” from the Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy An attempt to compile a list of the best articles in philosophy is, the editors admit, “as simple to state as it is admittedly impossible to fulfill,” given the massive volume of publications in philosophy each year and the diversity of criteria that may be employed. The results are the work of [More]

Two Philosophers Make British Academy Book Award Shortlist

The British Academy, the UK’s national organization for the humanities and social sciences has released the shortlist of candidates for its 2019 Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Global Cultural Understanding. The £25,000 ($30,900) annual prize, established seven years ago, “rewards and celebrates the best works of non-fiction that have contributed to global cultural understanding and illuminate the interconnections and divisions that shape cultural identity worldwide,” according to an announcement from the British Academy. Six books made the shortlist, including two by philosophers: The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity (Profile Books) by Kwame Anthony Appiah  How the World Thinks: A Global History of Philosophy (Granta Books) by Julian Baggini The other books on the list are: A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution (Allen Lane) by Toby Green Maoism: A Global History (Bodley Head) by Julia Lovell Remnants of Partition: 21 Objects from a Continent Divided (Hurst) by Aanchal Malhotra Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture (Verso) by Ed Morales There were originally 80 books under consideration for the prize. The president of the British Academy, Sir David Cannadine, says of the shortlisted books: Such rigorous, timely and original non-fiction writing provides the rich context the global community needs to discuss and debate present-day challenges. Each of the writers nominated for this year’s [More]

Philosophers Win ERC Starting Grants

The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the winners of its latest round of “starting grants,” and among them are several philosophers. They are: Rafał Banka, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, for Mereological Reconstruction of the Metaphysical System in the Daodejing (€229,500 / $252,600) Jonathan Birch, London School of Economics and Political Science, for Foundations of Animal Sentience (€1,500,000 / $1,652,000) Jason Konek, University of Bristol, for Epistemic Utility for Imprecise Probability (€1,490,433 / $1,641,000) David Ludwig, Wageningen University, for Local Ecologies of Knowledge: Towards a Philosophy of Ethnobiology (€1,500,000 / $1,652,000) Rik Peels, Free University of Amsterdam and Medical Centre, for The Epistemology and Ethics of Fundamentalism (details forthcoming) Hanno Sauer, Utrecht University, for The Enemy of the Good: Towards a Theory of Moral Progress (€1,500,000 / $1,652,000) The starting grants program aims to “help individual scientists and scholars to build their own teams and conduct pioneering research across all disciplines.” There’s more information, including links to lists of all of the grant winners, here. The post Philosophers Win ERC Starting Grants appeared first on Daily [More]

Campos Wins Brian Barry Prize

Andre Santos Campos, a research fellow and assistant professor at the Nova Institute of Philosophy at Nova University of Lisbon, has won the 2019 Brian Barry Prize in Political Science. Dr. Campos won the prize for his essay, “Representing the Future: The Interests of Future Persons in Representative Democracy.” The prize is awarded by the British Academy in partnership with Cambridge University Press and the British Journal of Political Science, in which the winning essay will be published. Created in 2014, the prize honors the late Brian Barry, well-known for his work in political and moral philosophy, and who was a founding editor of the journal and a distinguished fellow of the British Academy. As Dr. Campos notes, “Brian Barry was one of the first major political theorists to bring attention to the challenges posed by intergenerational justice to contemporary liberal democracies, especially concerning the future. This is undoubtedly one of the most pressing areas of research in political studies nowadays.” He adds, “To be able to contribute to it with my own research while following Professor Brian Barry’s footsteps is a privilege I accept as carrying great responsibility.” You can read more about this prize, and see a list of previous winners, here.   The post Campos Wins Brian Barry Prize appeared first on Daily [More]

Waithe Awarded 2019 Elisabeth of Bohemia Prize

Mary Ellen Waithe, professor emerita of philosophy at Cleveland State University, has been awarded the 2019 Elisabeth of Bohemia Prize.  The Elisabeth of Bohemia Prize is awarded to “an outstanding contemporary philosopher” whose work “preserves the memory of women in philosophy.” It is named for the philosopher Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia (1618-1680). The prize notice states: Mary Ellen Waithe is the author of the ground-breaking book series “A History of Women Philosophers”, published from 1987 to 1995, from ancient to contemporary women philosophers. With this work, she was the first to publish a book dedicated solely to women philosophers and a pioneer in the field of study on women philosophers. Her dedication motivated many others to join her cause and the project provided a much-needed impulse to further the recognition of women philosophers. The series presents an unparalleled contribution to the research on women in the history of philosophy and is extremely relevant to this day.  The prize of €3000 (approximately $3330) is sponsored by Ulrike Detmers and awarded in cooperation with Ruth Hagengruber, the director of the Center for the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists. It was awarded to Professor Waithe during the closing ceremony of the 2019 Libori Summer School. The post Waithe Awarded 2019 Elisabeth of Bohemia Prize appeared first on Daily [More]

Philosophers Among NEH Grant Winners

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has announced the winners of its latest round of grants.  Among the winners are several philosophy professors. They’re listed below, along with their project titles and descriptions, grant amounts, and grant types: Jose Bermudez (Texas A & M University) and Catherine Conybeare (Bryn Mawr College) Reconsidering the Sources of the Self in the Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern Periods A conference and preparation of an edited volume of essays on the influential Sources of the Self: The Making of Modern Identity by philosopher Charles Taylor (1931–).  $48,961 (Collaborative Research) Richard Cohen (University at Buffalo) Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics of Democracy A One-week seminar for 16 college and university faculty on Levinas and democracy. $63,789 (Seminars for College Teachers) Angela Coventry (Portland State University) David Hume in the Twenty-first Century: Perpetuating the Enlightenment A four-week institute for 30 college and university faculty on the Scottish thinker David Hume. $185,975 (Institutes for College and University Teachers) Karen Detlefsen (University of Pennsylvania) and Lisa Shapiro (Simon Fraser University) New Narratives in the History of Philosophy: Women and Early Modern European Philosophy A conference on the works of early modern women philosophers (1500 to 1850) in preparation for an edited volume of essays. $50,000 (Collaborative Research) Also funded is an education researcher’s [More]

2019 Public Philosophy Op-Ed Contest Results

The American Philosophical Association (APA) has announced the winners of its 2019 Public Philosophy Op-Ed Contest. The contest, run by the APA’s Committee on Public Philosophy, aims to recognize “up to five standout pieces that successfully blend philosophical argumentation with an op-ed writing style. Winning submissions will call public attention, either directly or indirectly, to the value of philosophical thinking. The pieces will be judged in terms of their success as examples of public philosophy, and should be accessible to the general public, focused on important topics of public concern, and characterized by sound reasoning,” according to the APA. The winners this year are: Brendan de Kenessey (University of Toronto) for “People are dying because we misunderstand how those with addiction think” at Vox.com. Benjamin Mitchell-Yellin (Sam Houston State University) for “The Mirror Test and the Problem of Understanding Other Minds” at Psychology Today Amia Srinivasan (St. John’s College, Oxford) for “Does anyone have the right to sex?” at The London Review of Books Bryan Van Norden (Vassar College) for “The Ignorant Do Not Have a Right to an Audience” at The Stone (The New York Times) Karina Vold (University of Cambridge) for “Are ‘you’ just inside your skin or is your smartphone part of you?” at Aeon Magazine You can learn more about the prize and see the list of previous winners here. The post 2019 Public Philosophy Op-Ed Contest Results appeared [More]

Sugden Wins APA’s 2019 Gittler Award

Robert Sugden, professor of economics at the University of East Anglia, is the winner of the American Philosophical Association’s 2019 Joseph B. Gittler Award. The Gittler award, established in 2007, is given annually in recognition of “an outstanding scholarly contribution in the field of the philosophy of one or more of the social sciences. The range of the social sciences is construed broadly so as to include anthropology, economics, education, government, history, psychology, sociology, and any other field that is normally located within the social science division in contemporary colleges and universities.” Professor Sugden won the the $4,000 prize for his book, The Community of Advantage: A Behavioural Economist’s Defence of the Market (Oxford University Press). The award selection committee said, “Robert Sugden’s book is a significant and powerful defense of a theory of the foundations of economics, which attempts to derive fundamental axioms and theorems of welfare economics from a contractarian approach in which the criterion of individual interest is not the satisfaction of preferences but rather opportunity.  The result is a defense of a regulated and psychologically/socially stable market economy (as opposed to a planned economy). Sugden offers an argument for what is mistaken about neoclassical economics and its problematic reliance on a preference-satisfaction criterion of individual interest.” More information about the [More]

Philosophers Win Several Large Grants in the Netherlands

Several philosophers are among the winners of large grants from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). They are: Reinhard Muskens (UvA) for “A Sentence Uttered Makes a World Appear” (€770,850 / $860,000) Hearing a sentence enables one to make a mental picture of its content. ‘The cat is on the mat’ is a sequence of words first and then an image. But how does that work? Our research uses logic and computation to answer this question. Robert van Rooij (UvA) for “Why We Believe Sharks Are Dangerous” We accept generic sentences like ‘Sharks are dangerous’, although sharks only seldomly attack us. It is important to understand why, because stereotypes are also expressed by such generic sentences. We  want to investigate whether the acceptance of such generalizing sentences can be explained by the way  expectations are learned. Han van Ruler (EUR) for “Decoding Descartes” Decoding Descartes unravels the ideas of the founder of modern philosophy and science René Descartes (1596–1650) in response to contemporary deadlocks in philosophy, psychology and neuroscience. By reevaluating Descartes’ work and correspondence, the project shows Descartes is still decisively relevant for contemporary debates in multiple disciplines from humanities to neuroscience. Maartje Schermer (EUR) for “Health and disease as practical concepts: a pragmatist approach to conceptualization of health and disease” Scientific, [More]

Philosophers Among New Fellows of the British Academy

The British Academy, an organization which, among other things, selects scholars in the humanities and social sciences as “fellows” to recognize their academic distinction, has included three philosophers as members of its 2019 class. They are: Gregory Currie, Professor of Philosophy, University of York Susan James, Professor of Philosophy, Birkbeck, University of London Robert Stern, Professor of Philosophy, University of Sheffield There were 76 new fellows in all. You can see the complete list of them here. The post Philosophers Among New Fellows of the British Academy appeared first on Daily [More]

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