Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

The State of Contemporary Metaphysics

“I think metaphysics is what it’s always been—and it’s hard to say what that is!” That’s Ross Cameron, professor of philosophy at the University of Virginia, answering a question from interviewer Richard Marshall about the state and content of metaphysics these days. He continues: I think it’s in a pretty good state: we’ve emerged from the darkness of logical positivism, ordinary language philosophy, and conceptual analysis, and are once again unapologetically trying to say something about reality! I suppose one thing that might surprise someone coming from near pre-Lewis/Kripke times is the variety of phenomena that are taken to be legitimate subjects of metaphysical theorizing. (Although it wouldn’t be at all surprising to someone from farther back in the history of philosophy.) People still do the metaphysics of time, possibility, existence, etc., but also the metaphysics of race, gender, disability, social groups, sexuality, etc. One sociological change is that it’s become absolutely standard to see these topics in metaphysics textbooks, being taught to undergraduates, being presented at mainstream metaphysics conferences, etc. I think that’s a very good thing. In the interview, Professor Cameron explains his views on a number of topics in contemporary metaphysics, including philosophy of time, grounding, mereology, and vagueness. His remarks are interesting and informative throughout. For example, in his answer to a question about grounding, he [More]

John Duns Scotus – The ‘Subtle Doctor’ – Philosopher of the Month

John Duns Scotus (b. c. 1265/1266–d. 1308) was one of the most significant Christian philosophers and theologians of the medieval period. Scotus made important and influential contributions in metaphysics, ethics, and natural theology. Little was known of his life but he was born in Scotland, became a Franciscan monk, spent his learning and professional life […] The post John Duns Scotus – The ‘Subtle Doctor’ – Philosopher of the Month appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesHow Rabindranath Tagore reshaped Indian philosophy and literatureG.E. Moore – his life and work – Philosopher of the MonthContinuing Jane Austen’s unfinished novel [More]

What is Truth?

In this article, we look at a definition of truth and how various systems of philosophy define truth, how to determine what is true, how the question 'what is truth' differs from the question 'what is knowledge', and how facts and reality relate to the question of truth. [More]

The Third Man Argument: Part 2

What is the difference between myself and the desk at which I sit? Neither are anything but a simple assembly of atoms, floating about a universe of others. Where do I cease, in wake of something else? The aim of this essay is to defend the Theory of the Forms, and argue against the Third Man Argument’s criticisms—to effectively defend Plato from both himself and those who took up arms provided by the arguments posed by the Parmenides. [More]

The Third Man Argument: Part 1

What is the difference between myself and the desk at which I sit? Neither are anything but a simple assembly of atoms, floating about a universe of others. Where do I cease, in wake of something else? The aim of this essay is to defend the Theory of the Forms, and argue against the Third Man Argument’s criticisms—to effectively defend Plato from both himself and those who took up arms provided by the arguments posed by the Parmenides. [More]

The Third Man Argument: Parts 3 & 4

What is the difference between myself and the desk at which I sit? Neither are anything but a simple assembly of atoms, floating about a universe of others. Where do I cease, in wake of something else? The aim of this essay is to defend the Theory of the Forms, and argue against the Third Man Argument’s criticisms—to effectively defend Plato from both himself and those who took up arms provided by the arguments posed by the Parmenides. [More]

Willfully Free from Free Will

This is the fundamental conceptual mistake at play in the collective global consciousness; the mind, whatever it is, does not control the body – it is a shadow of its activity, an afterglow if you will. This is a critical conclusion to draw, because it collapses free will from within by removing the concept of agency altogether. If there is no mental causal power due to the causal closure of the physical, we can never be the conscious authors of our thoughts, and therefore we can never be free. [More]

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Interview with

Dr. Robert McKim
  • on Religious Diversity
  • Professor of Religion and Professor of Philosophy
  • Focuses on Philosophy of Religion
  • Ph.D. Yale

Interview with

Dr. Alvin Plantinga
  • on Where the Conflict Really Lies
  • Emeritus Professor of Philosophy (UND)
  • Focuses on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion
  • Ph.D. Yale

Interview with

Dr. Peter Boghossian
  • on faith as a cognitive sickness
  • Teaches Philosophy at Portland State University (Oregon)
  • Focuses on atheism and critical thinking
  • Has a passion for teaching in prisons
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