Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

What is the Republican Party’s Political Philosophy?

Since the United States has only two major parties, each party will include people with different political philosophies. For example, Joe Biden differs significantly from Bernie Sanders. The Republican Party has tended to be more ideologically homogenous, but it also contains some degree of diversity. Some might be tempted to dismiss concerns about political philosophy [More]

On SHAPE: a Q&A with Lucy Noakes, Eyal Poleg, Laura Wright & Mary Kelly

OUP have recently announced our support for the newly created SHAPE initiative—Social Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts for People and the Economy. To further understand the crucial role these subjects play in our everyday lives, we have put three questions to four British Academy SHAPE authors and editors—social and cultural historian Lucy Noakes, historian of objects and faith Eyal Poleg, historical sociolinguist Laura Wright, and Lecturer in Contemporary Art History Mary Kelly—on what SHAPE means to them, and to their research.       Related StoriesSHAPE today and tomorrow: Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy and Julia Black (part two)Introducing SHAPE: Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy and Julia Black (part one)The power of pigs: tension and taboo in Haifa, [More]

Transformative choice and “Big Decisions”

Imagine being invited by a trusted friend to a “life-changing” event. Should you go? The event could be a church service, self-help talk, concert, movie, festival, hike, play, dinner party, book club, union organizing meeting, etc. What sorts of considerations do you reach for in making your choice? The philosopher L. A. Paul has put problems like these, termed transformative choices, on the map for philosophical and scientific inquiry.       Related StoriesLyricism as activism: Sigurd Olson and The Singing WildernessWas Spinoza a populist? [Long read]Fake news is not new: Russia’s 19th-century disinformation [More]

Lyricism as activism: Sigurd Olson and The Singing Wilderness

Placing the reader in the poetic and ethical space is the first step toward direct action that affects the larger human community: a step toward activism. Activism formalizes the values that inspire and ultimately direct our will—and action—to preserve and protect. By opening new worlds, other spaces, and creating experiences for the reader—and, crucially, letting the reader explore those worlds for herself or for himself—the lyric writer has an opportunity to create a protected zone for significant communication. The post Lyricism as activism: Sigurd Olson and <em>The Singing Wilderness</em> appeared first on OUPblog.        Related StoriesWas Spinoza a populist? [Long read]Fake news is not new: Russia’s 19th-century disinformation experimentPutting my mouth where my money is: the origin of [More]

Was Spinoza a populist? [Long read]

Recent studies of Spinoza’s political theory in a contemporary perspective often place it in one of two categories, depicting him either as a defender of individual free speech and liberal democracy or as a champion of radical democracy and collective popular power. For some, he is something like a liberal supporter of the equal individual rights of all citizens to express whatever is on their mind, an early defender of “free speech.” The post Was Spinoza a populist? [Long read] appeared first on OUPblog.        Related StoriesThe coming refugee crisis: how COVID-19 exacerbates forced displacementWhat if COVID-19 had emerged in 1719?Can skepticism and curiosity get along? Benjamin Franklin shows they can [More]

SHAPE today and tomorrow: Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy and Julia Black (part two)

This second part of our Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy, Director of Content Strategy & Acquisitions at OUP, and Professor Julia Black CBE FCA, Strategic Director of Innovation and Professor of Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and President-elect of the British Academy, reflects on how SHAPE disciplines can help us to understand the impact of the events of the pandemic and look towards the future of SHAPE. The post SHAPE today and tomorrow: Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy and Julia Black (part two) appeared first on OUPblog.        Related StoriesIntroducing SHAPE: Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy and Julia Black (part one)John Rawls: an ideal theorist for nonideal times?Tips for adapting the elementary music curriculum to online [More]

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