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Why do people touch each other all the time? Sex among holobionts

Nowadays, we are encouraged to exterminate our skin microbiome by means of various poisonous substances. But this is not a good idea. We are holobionts, and our microbiome is part of us. If we kill the microbiome, we kill ourselves. Touching each other is a way to keep our microbiome alive, it is a form of sex ("holosex") intended as a form of communication.  The lady in this picture seems to understand the point, at least judging from her unhappy expression. (see also the "proud holobionts" group on Facebook)Humans tend to touch each other. They hug, pat, rub, kiss, cuddle, clutch, caress, clasp, embrace, each other a lot. Think of the kissing habits ("la bise") that's typical of the French society, it is done also in Italy and in other Latin countries. In most societies (*), at least some kind of skin contact is supposed to be a sign of reciprocal trust and confidence.But, today, we are seeing a completely different pattern diffusing all over the world. With the coronavirus epidemic, people are not shaking hands anymore, to say nothing about kissing and hugging each other. Not only people don't want to touch other people, but they are also positively scared of getting close to each other. It is called "social distancing" and it involves a series of ritualized behaviors of dubious efficacy against the epidemic that include wearing face masks, sanitizing one's hands, spraying disinfectants all over people and things, raising plexiglass barriers, and more. So, what's [More]

Why do people touch each other all the time? The ways of sex among holobionts

Nowadays, we are continuously encouraged to exterminate our skin microbiome by means of various poisonous substances. But this is not a good idea. We are holobionts, and our microbiome is part of us. If we kill the microbiome, we kill ourselves. Touching each other is a way to keep our microbiome alive, it is a form of sex ("holosex") intended as a form of communication.  The lady in this picture seems to understand the point, at least judging from her unhappy expression. (see also the "proud holobionts" group on Facebook)Humans tend to touch each other. They hug, pat, rub, kiss, cuddle, clutch, caress, clasp, embrace, each other a lot. It is part of the various cultural habits of different societies. It is true that some cultures don't encourage this kind of contact in public (*). But, in many cases, reciprocal contact is common, think of the kissing habits ("la bise") that's typical of the French society, it is done also in Italy and in other Latin countries. In most societies, at least some kind of skin contact is supposed to be a sign of reciprocal trust and confidence.But, today, we are seeing a completely different pattern diffusing all over the world, even in cultures that, up to now, had encouraged physical contact. With the coronavirus epidemic, people are not shaking hands anymore, to say nothing about kissing and hugging each other. Not only people don't want to touch other people, but they are also positively scared of getting close to each other. It is [More]

What Can Be Learned from Bertrand Russell’s Life as a Philanderer? Part III

As Bertrand Russell moved from relationship to relationship, Russell eased into old age with Edith, his fourth wife and something with whom he experienced 'great happiness.' During this time, something appears to have changed in his temperment as well--a mellowness and comfort with life. Did his relationship with Edith help him finally discover something he sought all his life? [More]

What Can Be Learned from Bertrand Russell’s Life as a Philanderer? Part I

Russell springs to mind hunched over a cluttered bureau, suckling the temples of his spectacles in deep coitus with a battered tome, caring not for what might lie beyond its pages. This image is not, however, entirely accurate; he was not so musty and desolate in the way of his pigeonhole. He is remembered grandly as a philosopher, a mathematician, a revolutionary—but by no means least as a philanderer. [More]

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