Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

Legal Positivism

[Revised entry by Leslie Green and Thomas Adams on December 17, 2019. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Legal positivism is the thesis that the existence and content of law depends on social facts and not on its merits. The English jurist John Austin (1790 - 1859) formulated it thus: The existence of law is one thing; its merit and demerit [More]

Life Is a Lease Contract

by Jake Gray Growing up, I was adamantly afraid of death. I had a habit of leaving the TV on as I slept at night, so my thoughts wouldn’t drift towards my inevitable demise. The trailers I saw for the apocalyptic film 2012 left me hyperventilating and in tears. I was seven or eight at [More]

How pictures can lie

On 9 August 1997, The Mirror printed an edited photo of Diana, Princess of Wales, and Dodi Fayed on its front page. The edited photo shows Diana and Fayed facing each other and about to kiss, although the unedited photo reveals that at that point Fayed was facing an entirely different direction. Did The Mirror lie to its readers? The post How pictures can lie appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesWhy recognizing the Anthropocene Age doesn’t matterWhy there is a moral duty to voteWhen the movie is not like the book: faithfulness in [More]

Down Girl by Kate Manne Wins APA Book Prize

Kate Manne, associate professor of philosophy at Cornell University, has won the 2019 Book Prize from the American Philosophical Association (APA) for her Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny. The APA states: In Down Girl, Kate Manne calls attention to an underappreciated question in the literature: how should we understand misogyny? She advances a new account of it to make sense of some of the most fundamental issues in feminist thought and political philosophy. Despite the ambitious nature of her project, the end result is a powerful view that nevertheless seems like common sense. Manne has succeeded in measurably improving the quality of public discourse on very timely and vexed issues by writing a book that is both accessible and rigorous. The APA’s Book Prize is awarded every other year for the best, published book that was written by a younger scholar during the previous two years. The prize is $4,000, which will be presented at the upcoming Eastern Division meeting of the APA. Honorable Mention for the prize went to Sarah Moss, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Michigan, for her book, Probabilistic Knowledge.   The post Down Girl by Kate Manne Wins APA Book Prize appeared first on Daily [More]

Philosophy as a Transitional Genre: On Richard Rorty’s Intellectual Bequest

Recently, the Richard Rorty Society hosted the second international conference at Penn State University, with the title “Rorty’s Ethics.” The conference took place November 22-24th, 2019 at the Nittany Lion Inn, in State College. For this second international conference, Prof. Robert Brandom was the keynote speaker. The responses to his two plenaries were delivered by [More]

2019 Popper Prize Winner Announced

The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (BJPS) has selected Carlos Gray Santana (University of Utah) as the winner of its 2019 Karl Popper Prize for his “ground breaking” paper in the philosophy of geology. The Popper Prize is awarded annually to the article judged to be the best published in that year’s volume of the Journal, as determined by the editors-in-chief and the British Society for the Philosophy of Science Committee. Professor Santana won the prize for his article, “Waiting for the Anthropocene“. The BJPS editors-in-chief, Steven French (Leeds) and Wendy Parker (Durham), write: Are we at the dawn of a new geological epoch? Many have answered ‘yes’, coining the term ‘Anthropocene’ to designate the impact of humanity on the geological record. In this ground breaking paper, Carlos Santana notes that answering that question requires a radical shift in perspective for a historical science such as geology: whereas previously the identification of formal units of geological time was based on the groupings already present in the stratographic record, establishing such a distinction in the case of the Anthropocene requires the geologist to project herself into the future and imagine what that record will be, looking back to the current time. Santana argues that from such a future geologist’s perspective, we should refrain from adopting the Anthropocene as a new geological epoch, because of the fragility of such a projective move and [More]

Why recognizing the Anthropocene Age doesn’t matter

You’ve probably heard that we’re living in the Anthropocene, a new geological epoch in which human activity is the dominant geological process. If you’ve been attentive to discussion surrounding the Anthropocene, you probably also know that the Anthropocene Working Group, a panel of scientists tasked to make a recommendation as to whether geologists should formally recognize the Anthropocene, voted just a few months ago to recommend recognizing the new epoch. The post Why recognizing the Anthropocene Age doesn’t matter appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesWhy there is a moral duty to voteHow to address the enigmas of everyday lifePhilosopher of the Month – A 2019 [More]