Job market do’s and don’ts: teaching portfolios

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I’d like to continue our new job-market do’s and don’ts series today by asking search committee members to weigh in on what job candidates should and shouldn’t do in teaching portfolios. I’m a bit surprised that no one has weighed in on our thread on teaching statements, as there were quite a few helpful comments in the threads on CVs and cover letters. So, I’m hoping people may have more to say on teaching portfolios. 

I wrote one post on teaching portfolios back in 2015 in our Job Market Boot Camp, and another post in our “Notes from both sides of the market” series in 2016. However, I think it would be good to hear from search committee members on do’s and dont’s for:

How long teaching portfolios should/shouldn’t be (how many pages is too short/too long?)
What to include/not include in teaching portfolios

‘Selected’ student comments vs. complete/unedited student comments?
‘Letters of recommendation’ written by students?
Full syllabi vs. course descriptions + reading lists?
Syllabi only, or syllabi plus sample assignments?

How to format teaching portfolios

‘Raw’ teaching evaluations (formatted by university) vs. candidate-formatted summaries
Etc.

Any other do’s/don’ts?

On (4), are there things that you’ve seen candidates do in teaching portfolios that worked particularly well? Are there any common mistakes you’ve seen candidates make in teaching portfolios that you think candidates should know to avoid?

Finally, job candidates: feel free to ask search committee members in thread below any questions that you have about teaching portfolios (and search committees, feel free to answer)!

Originally appeared on The Philosophers’ Cocoon Read More

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