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The Career Trajectories and Workplace Skills of Philosophy and Language Majors

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A new study looks at the jobs and skills of college graduates, including those who major in philosophy, finds that choice of major “isn’t as deterministic of our work as we might believe,” and aims to help students understand how their education has prepared them for the job market. The study, “Degrees at Work,” by Clare Coffey, Rob Sentz, and Yustina Saleh, and published by the data analytics firm, Emsi, sorted college graduates from a database of over 100 million people by group, putting together those who major in philosophy and languages—“Two degrees that aren’t career-specific or as tied to the world of work (and are therefore the ones that get a vast bulk of the criticism [for being impractical])”. Not surprisingly, philosophy and language graduates “go into a broad array of jobs”: The top five first jobs are in the fields of education (17% of language and philosophy grads go into education jobs), journalism/writing (10%), sales (10%), marketing (7%), and service-oriented non-profits (6%).  The following graph shows how the popularity of different types of jobs changes over time as graduates in philosophy and language move from their first to their second and third jobs. (It lists types of jobs on the left, listed in order of popularity as first job.) from “Degrees at Work” by Coffey, Sentz, and Saleh So, for example, when it comes to the first job taken by philosophy and language graduates, the fourth most popular type of job is in marketing. When it comes to their third job, though, marketing is the second most popular type of job. Legal and regulatory services moves from 10th to 6th. Education remains the most popular category across job changes for philosophy and language graduates. This contrasts with social science students and business students, for whom sales is the consistently most popular category, communications students, for whom journalism and public relations is the most. . .

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News source: Daily Nous

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