VoegelinView in Review: October 2022
This October marked the best month of readership in the journal’s history and so far the four most-read months of VOEGELINVIEW have all occurred this year. When I became editor, with the blessing of the Eric Voegelin Society at my behest and the support of David Walsh, Jim Stoner, and our former editor-in-chief Lee Trepanier,… The post VoegelinView in Review: October 2022 appeared first on VoegelinView.

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This October marked the best month of readership in the journal’s history and so far the four most-read months of VOEGELINVIEW have all occurred this year. When I became editor, with the blessing of the Eric Voegelin Society at my behest and the support of David Walsh, Jim Stoner, and our former editor-in-chief Lee Trepanier, I began transforming the journal into an arts and humanities publication aiming for more cultural and public commentary. This transformation had already begun, in ways, under Lee Trepanier who began opening up the journal’s space for reflections on art, literature, music, and more. As of now, that transformation is complete. Going forward, our primary purpose is to be a journal of intellectual and cultural commentary on the arts and humanities while retaining its prioritization of any material relating to and dealing with Eric Voegelin. While academic articles (non-peer reviewed) are still accepted and will be given a fair editorial assessment, it is encouraged that contributors recognize that we are now read by tens of thousands of monthly readers (we eclipsed 40,000 for the first time this month with over 42,000 reads) and that our work aims at an educated, but not specialized, reading audience. Readability is a top priority. Most, though not all, of our most read reviews, essays, and articles are those written for the public rather than the specialist.
In this transformation, it is the intention of VOEGELINVIEW to become a hub for reviews, poems, and cultural criticism for the foreseeable future. Contributors are encouraged to submit new book reviews, poems, and essays dealing with art, culture, education, and literature. We are now more than a niche philosophy publication. With growing readership, networks, and donors, the bright future of this journal is ahead it.
Over the course of the year, I have also posted monthly reviews to keep readers and subscribers informed on these ongoing changes. With those changes now complete, the notification within the monthly review of such ongoing changes is no longer necessary. As such, I simply present you with some of the most read essays of October along with our book reviews and poems.

ARTICLES

A Philosopher and Blogger Debate Determinism Once More! by Richard Cocks
Determinism and the Good Life Are Incompatible by Richard Cocks

ESSAYS

Leopardi’s Eternity: A Translation and Interpretation of The Infinite by Marco Andreacchio
Milton as Metaphysician: “Paradise Lost” as a Map of Heaven and Hell by Pedro Blas Gonzalez
An Argument in the Metaxy: Lionel Trilling and Henry Rosenthal by Abigail Rosenthal
Haunted by Camille Saint-Saëns’ “Organ Symphony” by Terez Rose

COLUMNS

Lee Trepanier’s Education Reflections: The Reasons of Motivations: Teaching Kant to Freshmen; Slavery as the Original Sin of America?; Questioners of the World, Unite!; A Genealogy of Christianity: Why I Teach Nietzsche at a Christian University

BOOK REVIEWS

Plato’s Hippias Minor: The Play of Ambiguity by Zenon Culverhouse, reviewed by Phillip Pinell
Strange New World: How Thinkers and Activists Redefined Identity and Sparked The Sexual Revolution by Carl Trueman, reviewed by Paul Krause
Soldiers of God in a Secular World: Catholic Theology and Twentieth-Century French Politics by Sarah Shortell, reviewed by Timothy Howles
Nietzsche and Tocqueville on The Democratization of Humanity by David Eisenberg, reviewed by Paul Krause
The Man Who Understood Democracy: The Life of Alexis De Tocqueville by Olivier Zunz, reviewed by Paul Krause
Persians: The Age of the Great Kings by Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones, reviewed by Paul Krause

POEMS

Not Vanity by Mark Botts
Enough by Harry Eyres
from Spiking the Canon by Harry Ricketts
In Isaiah’s Sandals by Raymond Dokupil
Liberalism by Micah Veillon

SUPPORT OUR MISSION

Devoted to the revitalization of teaching and understanding of Eric Voegelin’s work and the fundamental expressions of human civilization in art, culture, philosophy, education, science, and politics, VOEGELINVIEW depends upon the generosity of readers like you, gifts that are tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law.
With support of the Center for the Study of Liberal Democracy, the University of Wisconsin Foundation – a 501(c)(3) organization (EIN 39-0743975) – receives donations by credit card on behalf of the journal. If you would like to give a gift now, please go here and make sure you have selected the VoegelinView fund: secure.supportuw.org/give
You can alternatively support the Eric Voegelin Society which is also a 501(c)(3) organization (Tax ID 45-5508836). The Eric Voegelin Society, which publishes VOEGELINVIEW, can be supported through Nicholls State University by going here: https://nichollsfoundation.org/donate-now/
Make sure to write “Eric Voegelin Society” in the comments when providing a donation by credit card. Alternatively contact Dr. David Whitney at david.whitney@nicholls.edu for instructions of how to make a contribution by check.

The post VoegelinView in Review: October 2022 appeared first on VoegelinView.

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