Kant’s Transcendental Arguments

Date

source

share

[Revised entry by Derk Pereboom on August 19, 2022.
Changes to: Main text, Bibliography]
Among Immanuel Kant’s (1724 – 1804) most influential contributions to philosophy is his development of the transcendental argument. In Kant’s conception, an argument of this kind begins with a compelling premise about our thought, experience, or knowledge, and then reasons to a conclusion that is a substantive and unobvious presupposition and necessary condition of this premise. The crucial steps in this reasoning are claims to the effect that a subconclusion or conclusion is a presupposition and necessary condition of a…

Originally appeared on Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Read More

More
articles

More
news

The importance of doubting

by Massimo Pigliucci There is freedom of thought, and each one can sustain what he wants, as for me, I...

The danger of ethics without empathy

The relationship between morality and emotion has divided thinkers for centuries. Most contemporary ethical systems demand impartiality; that we should...